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Announcement

CFHE statement on the nomination of Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education

We believe that public education, from pre-K through grade 12 and into post-secondary education, is at the core of our democracy, and of ensuring affordable, quality higher education for all who pursue it. The nomination of Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education makes clear that the new administration has no such commitment.

Announcement

Founding Meeting of the Campaign for the Future of Higher Education

Chronicle of Higher Education

Faculty Groups Gather to Craft a United Stand on Higher-Education Policy, January 23, 2011, by Audrey Williams June (PDF)

Inside Higher Education

Restoring the Faculty Voice, January 24, 2011, by Dan Berrett (PDF)

Times Herald / Vallejo, CA

California teachers join peers across the nation in campaign for more funding, January 27, 2011, by Sarah Rohrs (PDF)

Announcement

Launch of Campaign for the Future of Higher Education

At the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.INSIDE HIGHER ED
Reframing the Debate, by Dan Berrett, May 18, 2011‎

WASHINGTON — Faculty leaders from 21 states on Tuesday formally launched a nationwide effort to fight cuts to their institutions’ budgets and to make higher education more widely accessible, and they announced the formation of a think tank to advance … The Campaign for the Future of Higher Education, which resulted from a January meeting of leaders of faculty unions, espouses goals that are, at this point, more conceptual than concrete. The possible exception is the think tank, …

Announcement

Funding Higher Education: The Search for Possibilities

The Campaign for the Future of Higher Education calls on America’s college & university faculty to join in the search for new ways to fund higher education

National Telephone News Briefing

Tuesday, February 12, 10 am Pacific/1 pm Eastern
Call (800) 553-0273  / Ask for “Campaign for the Future of Higher Education”

  • The three authors of working papers on new ways to fund higher education will explain their proposals and take questions from the news media, including campus reporters and education bloggers.
  • The briefing begins a drive by CFHE for faculty to step up our role in the search for new possibilities that will save access to higher education and strengthen our nation’s middle class.
  • The briefing takes place on Abraham Lincoln’s birthday. Lincoln signed the 1862 Morrill Act that initiated America’s public higher education system, starting with Land Grant Colleges. Today that system spans the nation but is on the road to elimination.
Announcement

Comments by CFA President Lillian Taiz on Abraham Lincoln’s Birthday

The Campaign for the Future of Higher Education is working to bring fresh ideas into the conversation about higher education in the United States.

Those of us in this Campaign are the faculty in the trenches – teaching in the class rooms and doing the research alongside of America’s university students.

I’d like to welcome everyone to this call on Abraham Lincoln’s birthday.

Announcement

Papers explore new ways to fund higher education

The Campaign for the Future of Higher Education (CFHE) has begun a drive to involve our nation’s college and university faculty in the search for solutions to the seemingly unending cycle of funding cuts, privatization, soaring tuition and academic shut-downs.

On Tuesday, CFHE introduced three working papers with ideas on ways to fund higher education in America.

Announcement Inside Higher Ed

CHFE Comments on MOOC Mania

Susan Meisenhelder, the former president of the California Faculty Association and an active member of the faculty-led and MOOC-wary Campaign for the Future of Higher Education, said she is encouraged by what she sees as a slowing in pro-MOOC rhetoric.

Announcement

Coverage of CHFE Working Paper on $ and Online Ed

Educators Wary of Tech Fixes for College Affordability Crisis

A new report by the Campaign for the Future of Higher Education warns that college administrators and politicians might be investing too much in corporate-controlled, data-driven online learning programs.